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College Accommodations
for Students with Disabilities

Here are examples of accommodations that may be available at your college. Please check with their accessibility office or vocational rehabilitation counselor to determine which accommodations may be best for you.

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  • No penalties for spelling errors on papers or exams

  • Course substitutions for certain required or prerequisite courses

  • Extended time on assessments (quizzes, midterms, and final exams)

  • Testing in an alternative location

  • Breaks during exams

  • Reduced course load and extended time to complete degree requirements

  • Extensions for specific assignments

  • Weekly meetings with an accessibility counselor

  • Specific classroom seating

  • Specific housing arrangements

  • American Sign Language interpreters/translators

  • Particular types of desks and other furniture

  • More detailed syllabi to facilitate advanced planning of breaks, assignments, and test preparation

  • Choice of test format (multiple choice, true/false, essay) or awareness of format in advance

  • Open book or open note tests

  • Tests and directions read out loud, or read and repeated

  • Study guides or previews provided prior to tests

  • Calculator or laptop access

  • Extra credit options

  • Pacing for long-term projects

  • Previews of testing procedures

  • Simplified test wording, rephrased test questions and/or directions

  • Alternate ways to evaluate (e.g. projects or oral presentations instead of written tests)

AUXILIARY AIDS AND SERVICES

 

Auxiliary aids and services can take many forms, depending on the individual student’s needs:
 

  • Qualified interpreters, or other aural delivery of materials for individuals with hearing impairments

  • Note takers

  • Qualified readers for in-class texts or exams

  • Assistive technology

  • Digitally recorded texts or other effective methods of making visual materials available to individuals with visual impairments or learning disabilities

  • Class materials in alternative formats (e.g. texts in braille, recorded, or as digital files)

  • Acquisition or modification of equipment or devices